Identifying Ethiopia crash victims may take 6 months: airline

Identifying Ethiopia crash victims may take 6 months: airline

In the simulator, Aimer took off from the same airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, bound for Nairobi, Kenya, "flying" something like the Boeing 737 Max 8, a model that has since been grounded in the USA after the crash in Ethiopia earlier this month and another like it months before.

Canada and the United States on Wednesday joined other countries around the world in grounding the planes, after a deadly Ethiopian Airlines plane crash killed all 157 people on board.

Investigators in France on Friday examined the black boxes of the jet that crashed in Ethiopia as the global airline industry waited to see if the cause was similar to the disaster in Indonesia.

Forensic DNA work has begun on identifying the remains but it may take six months to identify the victims, because the body parts are in small pieces.

Children gather in front of a memorial on Saturday, March 16, 2019, where an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed almost a week earlier near Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Dagmawit said temporary death certificate had been given, and a final one would be issued in two weeks time.

The grounding of the 737 MAX jets has had no immediate financial impact on airlines using the planes, but it will get painful for the industry the longer they do not fly, companies and analysts said on Friday.

U.S. President Donald Trump spoke by telephone on Friday with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed about the crash, according to the White House.

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The New York Times reports that shortly before crashing, the 737 Max 8 plane erratically went up and down by hundreds of feet at an abnormally fast speed.

The civil aviation safety agency noted that the work on the flight data recorder would resume the following day.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said findings from the crash site and "newly refined satellite data" warranted "further investigation of the possibility of a shared cause for the two incidents".

Air traffic controllers were aware of the plane's flight path.

"Safety is Boeing's No. 1 priority and we have full confidence in the safety of the 737 Max", the statement read.

Investigators looking into the Indonesian crash are examining whether the software automatically pushed the plane's nose down repeatedly, and whether the Lion Air pilots knew how to solve that problem.

The 737 Max has flight-control software that can automatically tilt the stabilizers if sensors detect that the plane is in danger of losing aerodynamic lift from the wings, which is necessary to stay aloft.

The FAA has said that the Boeing 737 will not fly until a software update can be tested and installed.

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