Honda recalling over 1 million vehicles with dangerous air bags

Honda recalling over 1 million vehicles with dangerous air bags

A driver in Maryland was injured in a January crash when a 2004 Honda Odyssey driver-side air bag inflator, made by the now-defunct Takata Corp., ruptured, Honda said in a statement.

The automaker said in government fillings that it is aware of one injury related to the defective airbag inflators in the latest round of recalled vehicles.

Honda uses a "Takata" airbag system uses ammonium nitrate for their airbag inflation.

Only certain models from the aforementioned years are affected as the NHTSA says the recall involves vehicles which "received a replacement driver air bag inflator as part of a previous Takata inflator recall remedy or a replacement driver air bag module containing the same inflator type as a service part".

The recall includes some of Honda's most popular models, including Accord, CR-V, Civic, Element, Odyssey, Pilot and Ridgeline.

The probe determined that inflators made at Takata's Monclova, Mexico, factory were faulty due to a manufacturing defect, Honda said.

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Also included are certain 2003 Acura 3.2CL cars, as well as the 2013 to 2016 ILX, the 2003 to 2006 MDX, the 2007 to 2016 RDX, the 2002 to 2003 3.2TL, the 2004 to 2006 and 2009 to 2014 TL, and the 2010 to 2013 ZDX.

Honda is recalling about 1.2 million vehicles in North and Central America because their Takata air bag inflators can explode and send shrapnel into the passenger compartment.

The federal agency says the company will notify owners by mail.

Owners with any of the above vehicles can go to www.recalls.honda.com, and enter their VINs to find out if their cars are affected by the recall.

The addition of the additive and was thought to be a solution to the problem with the original air bags that were been found to activate with too much force in a crash, spraying the interior of vehicles with metal parts and leading to the recall of some 37 million vehicles in the U.S. They contained a moisture-absorbing chemical and previously were believed to be safe.

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