Radio signals from space : Are aliens trying to talk to us?

Radio signals from space : Are aliens trying to talk to us?

But only one burst has ever been traced back to its source: a repeating burst called FRB 121102, which flickers periodically from a dim dwarf galaxy 3 billion light-years away.

Radio signals coming from a distant galaxy in outer space have been detected by a telescope in Canada.

The researchers said that studying the fast radio bursts is a hard task because they're rare and only occur once.

Having two sets of repeating bursts could also allow scientists to understand what distinguishes them from single bursts, helping them understand more about their source and watch for future blasts. They're milliseconds in length and are typically thought to come from powerful space shit like black holes or super-dense neutron stars, but some researchers reckon they could even be evidence of advanced alien civilisations.

Work on the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), which Tendulkar and his colleagues used for their research, was not quite complete when this initial baker's dozen was detected last July and August.

The fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-long flashes of radio waves of unknown origin, and scientists have formulated several different theories as to how they might be generated.

Chime astrophysicist Dr Ingrid Stairs, from the University of British Columbia, explained its significance.

In 2007, an astronomy professor and his student detected a fast radio burst, a phenomenon that has been detected many times in the years since.

The repeating burst was among 13 fast radio bursts (FRB) recorded by a radio telescope located in B.C.'s Okanagan Valley.

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The amount of scattering observed by the team led them to conclude that the sources of FRBs are powerful astrophysical objects more likely to be in locations with special characteristics.

Until now, only one FRB - which was labeled FRB 112102 - was found to repeat itself later on.

"Whatever the source of these radio waves is, it's interesting to see how wide a range of frequencies it can produce", said CHIME scientist Arun Naidu of McGill University.

The majority of FRBs identified prior to CHIME's observations featured high frequencies, signals close to 1400 MHz.

"This is good news for radio telescopes that are sensitive at lower radio frequencies", she said.

Seeing two repeating signals probably means there exists a "substantial population" of repeating signals, the researchers write in one of the two papers published in Nature. "But it has to be in some special place tog I've us all the scattering that we see".

They said the finding provides new details about the "puzzling" yet "brief" radio energy from outside the galaxy.

The discovery is a sign that there could be even more repeating FRBs out there waiting to be found - and maybe even an answer to the mystery of their source. "It helps us build a more complete picture of the Universe".

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