NASA Recorded the Sounds of Mars (And It's Almost All Creepy Bass)

NASA Recorded the Sounds of Mars (And It's Almost All Creepy Bass)

NASA's InSight lander, which touched down on Mars on November 26, has provided the first ever "sounds" of Martian wind on the Red Planet, the NASA said. "A haunting low rumble" was recorded by the rover, which detected the vibrations from wind blowing across its large solar panels.

The audio was picked up by both an air pressure sensor and the seismometer aboard InSight.

It's been almost two weeks since NASA successfully landed its InSIght lander on Mars and the craft is getting ready to start its important work on the planet. You may need to put on earphones or crank up your subwoofer to hear what's going on in the first video, which is made up of raw data from the seismometer.

"But one of the things our mission is dedicated to is measuring motion on Mars, and naturally that includes motion caused by sound waves", Bruce Banerdt, the InSight principal investigator at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a statement.

New audio has been released from the surface of Mars, and the sound is more hauntingly familiar than you might expect.

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This image from InSight's robotic-arm mounted Instrument Deployment Camera shows the instruments on the spacecraft's deck, with the Martian surface of Elysium Planitia in the background. Once this is done, the seismometer will collect vibrations that come from the planet's depths.

You can hear more of the sounds here and listen to NASA's news telecon with a panel of scientists here. Below is what InSight's weather station recorded - specifically the low-frequency infrasound detected by its atmospheric pressure sensor.

"To me, the sounds are really unworldly", Banerdt said. When InSight is conducting its science mission, the seismometer won't be able to hear the wind, attuned only to the grumblings of the planet's interior.

The recorded sounds were "consistent with the direction of dust devil streaks in the landing area, which were observed from orbit", NASA said.

The air pressure sensor inside the shield will be relocated as well, and the team will gather data at night, when it expects the wind will have died down and the lander itself will be making less noise.

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