FDA puts e-cigarette companies on notice over teen access

FDA puts e-cigarette companies on notice over teen access

"I have grown increasingly concerned around what we see as rising youth use in these products, and I'm disappointed in the actions the companies have taken to try to address this", Gottlieb said in an interview.

Such a step would be a major blow to the e-cigarette companies - Juul, Vuse, Blu, Logic and MarkTen - which often feature cream and fruit flavorings in their products.

You can read the full New York Times article here. British American, which produces Camel cigarettes, climbed as much as 6.4 percent in London, the biggest intraday increase in 10 years.

E-cigarettes, aside from the occasional exploding piece of tech, are often considered by experts, including the FDA, to be potentially safer alternatives to conventional puff tubes.

"This could result in a bullet through the head of Juul, the driver of youth initiation", said Nico von Stackelberg, an analyst with Liberum in London. The premise of such threats is that the interests of adults who might want to switch from smoking to a far less hazardous form of nicotine consumption should be sacrificed for the sake of curtailing e-cigarette use by minors, which is already illegal. "And as far as the liquids we carry, we do not pick up brands that have the potential to appeal to children, because we have that responsibility", said Hutsell. He declined to disclose the evidence. But "the youth risk is paramount", he said. They noted the survey did not ask specifically about Juul, a sleek, heavily-marketed e-cigarette brand that exploded onto the market and accounts for 70 percent of US sales, according to analyst estimates. More generally, the FDA wants Juul and the other companies to contemplate "the particular youth appeal of their products", which involves features, such as style and convenience, that adults also happen to like.

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While e-cigarettes were first marketed to help adults quit smoking combustible cigarettes, they have now become a gateway to nicotine for teenagers. "By working together, we believe we can help adult smokers while preventing access to minors, and we will continue to engage with the FDA to fulfill our mission".

Additionally, 12 online retailers were found to be selling vaping products that were "misleadingly labeled and/or advertised e-liquids resembling kid-friendly food products", in violation of an earlier order from the FDA, and were also slapped with warning letters, according to the announcement.

"Let me be clear: Everything is on the table, including all our civil and criminal enforcement tools", Gottlieb said in a speech at FDA headquarters in Washington, D.C.

JUUL, a private company that doesn't make cigarettes; Logic, which is owned by the Japan Tobacco International, and R. J. Reynolds Vapor Company's Vuse said they plan to work with the FDA. He said in June tobacco companies "better step up and step up soon" but he didn't divulge what consequences the industry could face - until now. Critics of pushing back the deadline raised concern that more kids would take up vaping. The agency had for decades had no power to regulate cigarettes or other tobacco products, but Congress passed a law in 2009 giving FDA limited power to do so. The companies sell Vuse, Blu, Juul, MarkTen XL, and Logic e-cigarette brands, which account for 97 percent of US e-cigarette sales, according to FDA. The FDA claims that more than 2 million middle schoolers and high school students were regularly vaping a year ago, with underage use reaching "an epidemic proportion".

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