Dutch Ryanair pilots plan Friday strike as carrier takes union to court

Dutch Ryanair pilots plan Friday strike as carrier takes union to court

But the figure could rise to 82 flights if routes between the Dutch city of Eindhoven and the Spanish cities of Reus and Valencia are finally canceled, after a court said on Thursday that Dutch pilots may join the walkout.

But there have been protests ever since over the negotiating of collective labour agreements.

Germany will be worst hit, with 250 cancellations at ten airports after the country's Cockpit union called on pilots towalk out from 3.01am local time (2.01am BST).

"Ryanair alone is responsible for the escalation we are now seeing", Cockpit president Martin Locher said earlier this week.

The latest disruption is a result of industrial action by pilots in Ireland, Germany, Sweden, Belgium and the Netherlands.

"If this isn't available on the same or next day then we will accommodate you to your end destination on airlines with whom we have a reciprocal agreement".

Since the it first recognised unions in December 2017, walkouts have been staged multiple times by Ryanair staff in various countries.

The unions want the contracts of Ryanair employees to be governed by the laws of the nation where they are based, not by Irish legislation.

Staff claim this creates huge insecurity for them, blocking their access to state benefits in their country.

But the Haarlem District Court yesterday ruled against the airline.

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Which? travel editor Rory Boland said the dispute resolution service used by Ryanair had already confirmed it would uphold a previous European ruling that crew strikes are not usually considered "extraordinary circumstances".

The airline will hold talks via a mediator on Monday with the Irish pilots union, which said it had no current plans for further strikes.

The airline says 85 per cent of its Friday flights would operate and that affected customers would get email or text messages later on Wednesday.

He said: "Salaries can reach €190,000 per year, and are on average €150,000".

The unrest is one of the biggest challenges to face long-term chief executive Michael O'Leary, who was once quoted as saying he would rather cut off his hand than recognise unions and on another occasion crossed a picket line of baggage handlers to help load a plane.

It has already threatened to move part of its Dublin fleet to Poland, which could cost 300 jobs, including 100 pilot positions.

Unions have strongly condemned what they see as Ryanair's attempts to play countries off against each other.

"I think it also sends a signal to other companies where workers are played off against each other", he told Germany's regional broadcaster RBB.

Ryanair released a statement which reads: "We took every step to minimise the disruption and we notified our customers as early as possible advising them of their free move, refund or reroute options".

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